Tag Archives: Social Innovation

Now What? Three Success Factors for Translating the Corporate Responsibility to Respect into Practice

by Faris Natour, Leading Perspectives: A Trends and Solutions Publication from Business for Social Responsibility; Spring 2009. Corporate responsibility for human rights is a hot topic. As part of the discussions over the last few years, UN Special Representative for Business and Human Rights, John Ruggie, facilitated the development of a conceptual framework: ‘Protect, Respect, and Remedy.’ It asserts that the state maintains its duty to protect citizens from corporate human rights abuses. The corporate … Continue reading

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Sustainability key to economic survival

by Sarah Rich, The Australian, 22 April 2009. (Reported by Xander Wheen) The value of sustainable business practices has been thrown into question on the back of the Global Financial Crisis. Some believe that a down market begets a singular focus on profit maximisation. This article from The Australian traces a series of high profile individuals who tend to disagree. Sustainability in business remains key to Tyndall’s Roger Collison, Insurance Australia Group’s Mike Wilkins, and … Continue reading

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Book Review: Creating a World Without Poverty

Book by Muhammad Yunus. Reviewed by Barbara Merz. Creating a World Without Poverty could easily have been a retrospective. After all, its author has plenty to reflect upon. Instead, the book is unmistakably forward-looking. This book presents a compelling vision for the future of capitalism. It envisions a market where social businesses emerge to address social issues. Muhammad Yunus could have rested on his laurels when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. … Continue reading

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The Phoenix Economy: 50 Pioneers in the Business of Social Innovation

Volans Ventures Ltd, London, UK; 2009. If you are looking for concrete examples of social enterprise, flick through this report. “The Phoenix Economy” features fifty examples of social innovation pioneers including businesses, financial investment houses, and governments. According to the report, the chosen fifty “create value blends across the triple bottom line agenda.” Some of the pioneers are household names including Google, General Electric, and GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals. Many examples deal with the environment. For a … Continue reading

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Microfinance Banana Skins 2009: Confronting Crisis and Change

by David Lascelles and Sam Mendelson, Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation; June 2009. For a clear risk report on the microfinance industry, the folks at the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation give us “Microfinance Banana Skins 2009.” The “banana skins” in their title refers to potential risks, as in the classic cartoon slip-up. This report spotlights current risks associated with the microfinance industry. The risks are identified and ranked by investors, … Continue reading

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Ten Nonprofit Funding Models

by William Landes Foster, Peter Kim, and Barbara Christiansen, The Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring 2009. This article recommends that a new shorthand lexicon is needed for nonprofit leaders to articulate quickly and clearly how their organisations are focused and financed. The authors provide a useful cheat-sheet to alleviate funding fuzziness in the nonprofit sector. They identify the following ten nonprofit funding models: 1) Heartfelt connector – focusing on a cause that resonates with people … Continue reading

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Message in a Bottle: David de Rothschild’s Oceanic Eco-crusade

by John Colapinto, The New Yorker; April 6, 2009. What on earth is a billionaire doing cruising the Pacific on a bottleboat named Plastiki? To find the answer to that question requires a bit of history and a bit of imagination. In 1947, the Kon-Tiki set sail across the Pacific Ocean from Peru to Polynesia on a demonstration voyage to show that tribes from South America could have crossed the ocean and settled the Polynesian … Continue reading

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Participation Society

Griffith Review, Edition 24, by Griffith University, 2009. CSI’s very own Peter Shergold and Cheryl Kernot appear in the Griffith Review’s recent issue on participation society. Both essays are reminders that structural innovation is at work in Australian society. Kernot’s essay, ‘A quiet revolution,’ is a personal reflection on a shift she sees towards a society which puts: “social value at its core.” Kernot writes about social entrepreneurship which she believes is already reshaping people’s … Continue reading

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Autumn 2009: Innovative Thinking about Social Impact

Welcome to the third issue of Knowledge Connect, CSI’s review that seeks to connect readers to ideas and debates related to social impact. This issue highlights articles that deal with innovation – a fashionable term in social impact circles. The summaries below highlight social innovators at work and some of the behind-the-scenes work required to make these innovative ideas stick. Writer and activist Peter Singer pushes innovative thinking directly onto the world stage with his … Continue reading

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Fair go nation has gone

by Peter Wilson, The Australian; May 9, 2009. Australia may have built its reputation as a society that offers a ‘fair go,’ but a recently released book challenges this selfperception. And what’s more, it says our lack of equality may be bad for our health. The Spirit Level: Why Equal Societies Almost Always do Better, by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, has already stirred up debate in the United Kingdom. Now, this book has come … Continue reading

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