Tag Archives: Ethics

Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change

by Adam Kahane, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2010. Adam Kahane spoke about Power and Love to a Sydney Leadership audience at The Benevolent Society earlier this year. After two decades of work with seemingly intractable conflicts around the world, Kahane understands the challenge of wedding principles to practicalities. He pins the failures of the Copenhagen climate change summit to bring together the greenies’ love camp with the industrialists’ power camp. Rhetorical pleas to save the planet for … Continue reading

Posted in Ethics, Issue 7: Winter 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Now What? Three Success Factors for Translating the Corporate Responsibility to Respect into Practice

by Faris Natour, Leading Perspectives: A Trends and Solutions Publication from Business for Social Responsibility; Spring 2009. Corporate responsibility for human rights is a hot topic. As part of the discussions over the last few years, UN Special Representative for Business and Human Rights, John Ruggie, facilitated the development of a conceptual framework: ‘Protect, Respect, and Remedy.’ It asserts that the state maintains its duty to protect citizens from corporate human rights abuses. The corporate … Continue reading

Posted in Corporate Responsibility, Issue 3: Autumn 2009 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

The Big Conversation

A status report by Sandy Blackburn-Wright, Emerging Leaders for Social Change; 2010. The Big Conversation – an initiative of the Emerging Leaders for Social Change – was established in response to a void in the 2009 discussions surrounding the Global Financial Crisis. Leaders were debating the efficacy of the stimulus package, regulatory reform and other measures seemingly without reference to the values that had led us to the situation in the first place. Many believe … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 6: Autumn 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

An Ounce of Advocacy

by Alyssa Battistoni, The Stanford Social Innovation Review; Winter 2010. Though it is painful to read an ‘I told you so’ article published in the face of mass suffering, Battistoni’s piece was prepared in advance of the recent earthquake. Her article, in fact, presages many harsh truths rediscovered amidst early recovery efforts in Haiti. Namely, had there been more effort put into disaster preparedness, building code enforcement, or warning systems, the extent of the devastation … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 6: Autumn 2010 | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

The Wrong Risks

by Sheela Patel, The Stanford Social Innovation Review; Winter 2010. Railing against the culture of measurement, Sheela Patel takes professional philanthropists to task for the “log-frame virus” which she describes as “an infection that drives funders to insist upon seeing the logical framework or business plan of an intervention, from inputs, to outputs, to outcomes.” Patel has worked for grassroots organisations in India for over three decades and is the founding director of the Society … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 6: Autumn 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Suffering

by George Packer, The New Yorker; January 25, 2010. When news of the earthquake that killed more than 200,000 Haitians hit the wires in mid January, humanitarian experts knew the final devastation toll would be grim. The extent of the damage of a natural disaster is always compounded by the weakness of existing infrastructure – both physical and political. For years international development observers have reported that Haitians are the poorest people of the Western … Continue reading

Posted in Ethics, Issue 6: Autumn 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

Book Review: Creating a World Without Poverty

Book by Muhammad Yunus. Reviewed by Barbara Merz. Creating a World Without Poverty could easily have been a retrospective. After all, its author has plenty to reflect upon. Instead, the book is unmistakably forward-looking. This book presents a compelling vision for the future of capitalism. It envisions a market where social businesses emerge to address social issues. Muhammad Yunus could have rested on his laurels when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Corporate Responsibility, Ethics, Issue 4: Spring 2009, Social Enterprise, Social Investment | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Book Review: The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty

BY Peter Singer, Text Publishing , Melbourne; 2009. Reviewed by Dr. Michael Liffman, Director, Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Investment and Philanthropy, Swinburne University. Peter Singer’s latest book should be one of his least controversial – and, paradoxically, therefore one of his most important. Singer’s ideas inevitably excite heated debate, largely because, notwithstanding their extraordinary lucidity, logic and respect for facts, they rest on premises – the priority of avoiding suffering, the interests of animals, the … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 3: Autumn 2009 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Can the Rich Save the World? An interview with Matthew Bishop and Michael Green

Caroline Hartnell, Alliance Magazine; October 1, 2008. Matthew Bishop coined the term ‘Philanthrocapitalism’ in an essay for The Economist in February 2006, referring to the movement to make non-profits more like businesses and create new markets for goods and services with positive social impact. In their new book: Philanthrocapitalism: How the rich can save the world, Bishop and co-author Michael Green probe the potential they see when philanthropy combines with capitalism to benefit society. They … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 1: Spring 2008 | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

Rich Bitch

by Jeffrey Toobin, New Yorker; September 29, 2008. For a tale of philanthropic extravagance, we need not look far from Wall Street. In the New Yorker, contributor Jeffrey Toobin tells a fetching story of a cashed-up pooch named Trouble. Trouble, a female Maltese, was left US$12 million in a trust fund by her owner, the notorious New York hotel tycoon, Leona Helmsley. Ms Helmsley’s bequest and the establishment of her foundation (purportedly worth between $3 … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 1: Spring 2008 | Tagged , | Comments Off