Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012Subscribe via RSS

Book Review: The Illusions of Entrepreneurship, Scott A. Shane, 2008, Yale University.

Reviewed by Cheryl Kernot UK social entrepreneurship and social innovation pioneer, (currently CEO of NESTA), Geoff Mulgan recommended this book as a useful and interesting read. I wanted to see whether the same “illusions” might apply equally to social entrepreneurs. Specifically written for the diverse audience of entrepreneurs, investors and policy makers Shane’s motivation in writing is to challenge the repeated and unhelpful myths surrounding entrepreneurship discourse: how so many  “penniless dropouts become multimillionaires” , … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Social Enterprise | Leave a comment

Legislating for Social Value

Teasdale, S., Alcock, P., & Smith, G. 2011. Legislating for the Big Society? The Case of the Public Services (Social Enterprise and Social Value) Bill, paper presented at Social Policy Association Conference, University of Lincoln, 4-6 July 2011. The Public Services (Social Enterprise and Social Value) Bill, a Conservative MP’s Private Member’s Bill to enshrine the importance of social value creation and social impact is making its way through the UK Parliament. The Bill was … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Public Policy, Social Enterprise | Leave a comment

The UK’s Big Society experiment: “the move away from Big Government.”

The UK Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government has embraced a vision for a Big Society, described by them “as helping people to come together to improve their own lives. It’s about putting more power in people’s hands – a massive transfer of power from Whitehall to local communities; allowing more diverse providers of public services and greater power for communities to make local decisions, bringing huge opportunities to charities, voluntary groups and social enterprises.” The three … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Public Policy, Social Enterprise | Leave a comment

Shorebank: Too Good to Fail?

Stanford Social Innovation Review Fall 2011 “On Aug. 20, 2010, the Illinois Department of Financial & Professional Regulation closed ShoreBank, the nation’s first and leading community bank, and appointed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) as receiver. The closure was not unexpected. Reports of the bank’s problems—and a potential rescue—had been circulating for months. But the closure brought to a bitter end an iconic example of progressive social enterprise.” ShoreBank was 37 years old. This … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Social Enterprise, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

oikos case study on Better Place (Electric Powered Cars)

Better Place: Shifting Paradigms in the Automotive Industry, Dror Etzion and Jeroen Struben (McGill University, Canada) This is the 2011 winner of the oikos Case Study competition in which oikos and Ashoka join forces to promote the creation of high quality teaching cases on Corporate Sustainability (supported by oikos foundation) and Social Entrepreneurship (supported by Ashoka). The competition welcomes entries from all parts of the world. Written feedback is given to each case contributor. The … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Social Enterprise, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012: Social Entrepreneurship – The Revolution Matures

The discourse around social entrepreneurship continues at a pace: more international conferences, research interest, journals and university courses are some of the identifiers. Alongside the continuing emergence of innovative start-up social enterprises and          businesses is the reality that the field has matured sufficiently to begin to measure impact: some established social ventures have scaled up and succeeded and some have failed. Hence I have included the recently published case study of … Continue reading

Posted in Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Issue Front Page, Public Policy, Social Enterprise | Leave a comment