Book ReviewsSubscribe via RSS

Book Review: This is Service Design Thinking: Basics, Tools, Cases

By Jakob Schneider, Marc Stickdorn Schneider, J. and Stickdorn, M. (2011) This is Service Design Thinking: Basics, Tools, Cases, John Wiley and Sons, New Jersey Guest Reviewer:  Jacqueline Wechsler Design is not the narrow application of formal skills, it is a way of thinking. – Chris Pullman This is Service Design Thinking presents an inter-disciplinary approach to service innovation. Where the distinction between product and services is disappearing, and where the services sector within Australia … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 13: Autumn 2012, Social Design, Social Innovation | Comments Off

Book Review: Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organisations and Inspires Innovation

By Tim Brown and Barry Katz Brown, T. and Katz, B. (2009)  Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organisations and Inspires Innovation, Harper Business, New York Guest Reviewer: Joanne Hutchinson If you are attracted to design thinking, and wondering where to start, then let me introduce you to one of my favourite books in this area:  Change by Design – How design thinking transforms organisations and inspires innovation. This book is a pleasure to … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 13: Autumn 2012, Social Design, Social Innovation | Leave a comment

Book Review: The Illusions of Entrepreneurship, Scott A. Shane, 2008, Yale University.

Reviewed by Cheryl Kernot UK social entrepreneurship and social innovation pioneer, (currently CEO of NESTA), Geoff Mulgan recommended this book as a useful and interesting read. I wanted to see whether the same “illusions” might apply equally to social entrepreneurs. Specifically written for the diverse audience of entrepreneurs, investors and policy makers Shane’s motivation in writing is to challenge the repeated and unhelpful myths surrounding entrepreneurship discourse: how so many  “penniless dropouts become multimillionaires” , … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 12: Summer 2011-2012, Social Enterprise | Leave a comment

Book review: Philanthro-capitalism: How the Rich Can Save the World

Book by Matthew Bishop and Michael Green, published by A & C Black, London, 2008. Paperback edition published 2010. Reviewed by Elena Douglas In politics, most debates focus on two questions: What are you going to do? And how much money are you going to spend on it? Too little attention is given to what is often the most important question: How are you going to do it? President Bill Clinton, Foreword to 2010 paperback … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 11: Spring 2011, Philanthropy | Leave a comment

Book Review: Volunteers: A social profile

Book by Marc A. Musick and John Wilson. Published by Indiana University Press, 2008 Reviewed by Prof. Ram Cnaan Twenty years ago I was able to read everything that was written on volunteers; today, Musick and Wilson demonstrate that it is no longer possible. This book is the most successful attempt to provide an authoritative review of the state of knowledge on volunteering, looking at hundreds of sources. For many reasons outlined in the first … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 9: Autumn 2011, Volunteering | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Book Review: In Search of Civilization: Remaking a Tarnished Idea

Book Review: In Search of Civilization: Remaking a Tarnished Idea Book by John Armstrong, published by Penguin Books Australia, 2009 Reviewed by Dr Joseph Collins In Search of Civilization helps us explore a philosophical journey about the idea of civilization.  It begins with seemingly benign propositions: civilization ‘shapes its members’ sense of right from wrong’, ‘it’s all to do with the sophisticated pursuit of pleasure’ and ‘it requires a high level of intellectual and artistic … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Corporate Responsibility, Ethics, Issue 8: Summer 2010-2011 | Tagged , | Comments Off

Book Review: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

Book by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer, HarperCollins, 2009. Reviewed by Barbara Merz. This book was my companion while delayed at an airport recently. Right beside the Starbucks café at LAX airport waiting for my flight to Sydney I noticed an advert with a small Afghani girl with bright eyes and a determined face. It read ‘Role Model.’ Fellow travelers were stopping by, perhaps jarred by the message. The poster was part of a broader … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 6: Autumn 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Book Review: Blessed Unrest

Book by Paul Hawken. Reviewed by Jonathon Fisher. “Only connect,” wrote the British author E.M. Forster. This is the message I take from Paul Hawken’s Blessed Unrest, a book which has important lessons for those of us catalysing social change movements. Blessed Unrest suggests that although there are vast numbers of people and organisations who share the desire for a transition to a saner and wiser culture, most of them are not connected with each … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 7: Winter 2010 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Book Review: Creating a World Without Poverty

Book by Muhammad Yunus. Reviewed by Barbara Merz. Creating a World Without Poverty could easily have been a retrospective. After all, its author has plenty to reflect upon. Instead, the book is unmistakably forward-looking. This book presents a compelling vision for the future of capitalism. It envisions a market where social businesses emerge to address social issues. Muhammad Yunus could have rested on his laurels when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Corporate Responsibility, Ethics, Issue 4: Spring 2009, Social Enterprise, Social Investment | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Book Review: The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty

BY Peter Singer, Text Publishing , Melbourne; 2009. Reviewed by Dr. Michael Liffman, Director, Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Investment and Philanthropy, Swinburne University. Peter Singer’s latest book should be one of his least controversial – and, paradoxically, therefore one of his most important. Singer’s ideas inevitably excite heated debate, largely because, notwithstanding their extraordinary lucidity, logic and respect for facts, they rest on premises – the priority of avoiding suffering, the interests of animals, the … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Issue 3: Autumn 2009 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off